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Hypertension and obesity comorbidities increases coronary risk, affects domains of sexual function and sexual quality of life

Abstract

About 25% of the world’s adult population suffers from arterial hypertension with about 1.5 billion estimated to develop hypertension by 2025. Hypertensive patients have been reported to have a higher risk of developing diabetes and sexual dysfunction. Hypertension have been linked with lubricative and orgasmic difficulties in females, as wel as ED and vascular disease in men. Obesity has also been linked to ED in diabetic males as well as several aspects of female sexuality. Hypertension and obesity are closely related, each occurring in greater frequency with the other, it is only logical to think that comorbidities of obesity and hypertension could increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and SD. This research looks at the relationship between hypertension and obesity comorbidities and its association with sexual function in type II diabetics. Diabetic patients who were at least 18 years old and were engaged in a stable heterosexual relationships for at least 1 year were recruited for this study. Participants were categorized into the −HYP/−OB, +HYP/−OB and the +HYP/+OB groups. Sexual function was assessed using the GRISS-M and GRIS-F for the diabetic males and females respectively. Early morning fasting blood samples was used in lipid profile as well as FBG assay. The Coronary risk was estimated as Total/HDL Cholesterol. Triglyceride levels and coronary risk were highest in the +HYP/+OBES group, followed by the +HYP/−OBES group, with the −HYP/−OBES group recording the lowest levels. PE and infrequency recorded the highest score among the +HYP/+OBES group with the +HYP/−OBES group recording the lowest scores. SQoL was highest amongst the −HYP/−OBES group, with the +HYP/+OBES group recording the lowest scores. Anorgasmia and avoidance increased along the shades of HYP/OBES groups. Comorbidities of hypertension and obesity increases the risk of coronary disease, affects some domains of sexual function and decreases the SQoL of diabetics.

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Acknowledgments

Authors' contributions

H.A., W.K.B.A.O., N.A., C.O., and C.K.G.S. developed the concept and designed the study. H.A., N.A., W.K.B.A.O., P.P.M.D., C.O., A.T.L., and A.T.B. administered the questionnaire, analyzed and interpreted the data. H.A., N.A., W.K.B.A.O., P.P.M.D., C.O., and A.T.B. performed all the assay procedures. H.A., W.K.B.A.O., N.A., C.O., P.P.M.D., A.T.L., and A.T.B. drafted the manuscript. H.A., W.K.B.A.O., N.A., P.P.M.D., C.O., C.K.G.S., and A.T.B. revised the manuscript for intellectual content. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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The study was privately funded by the authors.

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Correspondence to H. Alidu.

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The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Ethical approval was obtained from the Committee on Human Research Publication and Ethics (CHRPE) of the School of Medical Science and the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH), Kumasi.

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All participants gave informed and signed consent to partake in this study.

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Alidu, H., Owiredu, W.K.B.A., Amidu, N. et al. Hypertension and obesity comorbidities increases coronary risk, affects domains of sexual function and sexual quality of life. Int J Impot Res 30, 8–13 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41443-017-0003-5

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