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Screening study of cancer-related cellular signals from microbial natural products

Abstract

To identify bioactive natural products from various natural resources, such as plants and microorganisms, we investigated programs to screen for compounds that affect several cancer-related cellular signaling pathways, such as BMI1, TRAIL, and Wnt. This review summarizes the results of our recent studies, particularly those involving natural products isolated from microbial resources, such as actinomycetes, obtained from soil samples collected primarily around Chiba, Japan.

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Acknowledgements

The author thanks Professor Midori A. Arai (Keio University), Dr. Yasumasa Hara, and all laboratory members for their continuous and valuable efforts in this study. He also thanks Dr. Takao Yaguchi (Medical Mycology Research Center, Chiba University) for the identification of the actinomycete strains. This work was supported by KAKENHI Grant nos. 20H03394 and 19H04640 from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and the Strategic Priority Research Promotion Program of Chiba University.

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Correspondence to Masami Ishibashi.

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Ishibashi, M. Screening study of cancer-related cellular signals from microbial natural products. J Antibiot 74, 629–638 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41429-021-00434-1

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