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What should be clarified when learning the International Standards to Document Remaining Autonomic Function after Spinal Cord Injury (ISAFSCI) among medical students

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The data generated or analyzed in this study are available from the corresponding author upon reasonable request.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 11502003; the National Natural Science Foundation of China No. 81871851.

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Correspondence to Nan Liu.

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Study setting: Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China

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Xing, H., Liu, N., Krassioukov, A.V. et al. What should be clarified when learning the International Standards to Document Remaining Autonomic Function after Spinal Cord Injury (ISAFSCI) among medical students. Spinal Cord Ser Cases 7, 68 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41394-021-00431-4

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