Assessing the ability of the Sacral Autonomic Standards to document bladder and bowel function based upon the Asia Impairment Scale

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Abstract

Study design

Retrospective review of data.

Objective

To determine if there is a relationship between the Asia Impairment Scale (AIS) and the bladder and bowel components of the International Standards to Document Remaining Autonomic Function after SCI (ISAFSCI).

Setting

University-Based Academic Rehabilitation Program.

Methods

Retrospective cross-sectional study assessing International Standards for Neurologic Classification After SCI (ISNCSCI) examination along with bladder and bowel components of the ISAFSCI.

Results

Subjects with AIS A injuries were statistically less likely to have history of bladder control and bowel control per investigator determination and bladder sensation via self-report versus patients categorized with AIS B injuries. Self-reported history of bowel sensation and control of voiding were more likely in subjects with C, D, or E injuries than with B injuries. Bowel and bladder control as determined by investigator and bladder and bowel sensation and control as self-reported were all statistically less likely in persons with AIS A injuries versus CDE.

Conclusions

This retrospective study provides initial data regarding components of the bladder and bowel sections of the sacral ISAFSCI and AIS. Further prospective research is needed to further characterize the relationship between retention of bladder and bowel sensation and function and the AIS. We suggest that incorporation of the sacral components of the ISAFSCI into the ISNCSCI may be beneficial to obtain further information about retention of sacral function with specific patterns of injury.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the United States National Institute of Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research.

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Correspondence to Marca Alexander.

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Alexander, M., Carr, C., Alexander, J. et al. Assessing the ability of the Sacral Autonomic Standards to document bladder and bowel function based upon the Asia Impairment Scale. Spinal Cord Ser Cases 5, 85 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41394-019-0228-2

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