In infants with severe bronchiolitis: dual-transcriptomic profiling of nasopharyngeal microbiome and host response

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Fig. 1: Nasopharyngeal airway microbiome function and host response between five respiratory syncytial virus and five sole rhinovirus bronchiolitis.

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Funding

The current study is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD): R01 AI-127507, R01 AI-134940, R01 AI-137091, and UG3/UH3 OD-023253. The content of this manuscript is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. M.P.-L. was partially supported by the Margaret Q. Landenberger Research Foundation, the NIH National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (Award Number UL1TR001876), and the Fundação para a Ciência e a Tegnologia (T495756868-00032862).

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M.F. carried out the statistical analysis, drafted the initial manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. K.H. conceptualized and designed the study, obtained the funding, reviewed and revised the initial manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. J.P.B., R.J.F., B.H., E.C.-N., and M.P.-L. generated the RNAseq data, carried out the statistical analysis, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted. J.M.M. and C.A.C. conceptualized and designed the study, supervised the conduct of the study, reviewed and revised the manuscript, and approved the final manuscript as submitted.

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Correspondence to Michimasa Fujiogi.

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The authors declare no competing interests.

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Fujiogi, M., Camargo, C.A., Bernot, J.P. et al. In infants with severe bronchiolitis: dual-transcriptomic profiling of nasopharyngeal microbiome and host response. Pediatr Res 88, 144–146 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41390-019-0742-8

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