Multiple myeloma gammopathies

ADARs, RNA editing and more in hematological malignancies

Abstract

Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing is the most prevalent type of RNA editing in humans, mediated by the adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs). Physiologically, these enzymes are present in the nucleus and/or the cytoplasm, where they catalyze the conversion of adenosines (A) to inosines (I) on double-stranded mRNA molecules. Aberrant ADAR-mediated-editing is a prominent feature in a variety of cancers. Importantly, the biological functions of ADARs and its functional implications in hematological malignancies have recently been unraveled. In this review, we will highlight the functions of ADARs and their involvements in cancer, specifically in hematological malignancies. RNA editing‐independent function of cellular processes by ADARs and the potential of developing novel therapeutic approaches revolving RNA editing will also be discussed.

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Fig. 1: The ADAR (Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA) family of editases.
Fig. 2: Overview of the functional consequences of ADAR-mediated A-to-I RNA editing.
Fig. 3: RNA editing-independent functions of ADARs.

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Teoh, P.J., Koh, M.Y. & Chng, W.J. ADARs, RNA editing and more in hematological malignancies. Leukemia (2020). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41375-020-01076-2

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