The importance of a valid assessment of salt intake in individuals and populations. A scientific statement of the British and Irish Hypertension Society

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FPC is a technical advisor to the World Health Organization, President and Trustee of the British and Irish Hypertension Society. PSS declares that he has no conflict of interest.

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