Original Article | Published:

Polymer Surface and Interfaces

Platelet-adhesion behavior synchronized with surface rearrangement in a film of poly(methyl methacrylate) terminated with elemental blocks

Polymer Journal volume 48, pages 413419 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) terminated with elemental blocks containing polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS), hereafter referred to as PPMP, was synthesized by living anionic polymerization. Combining modern interfacial-sensitive spectroscopy with traditional contact angle measurements, static and dynamic structures at the surface of PPMP films in water were examined. The surface of the well-annealed PPMP films, where the POSS end groups were preferentially segregated, was flat at the sub-nanometer level. Once the PPMP film was immersed in water, the surface was reorganized, and the rate was much slower for PPMP than for the conventional PMMA. This implies that the POSS units hindered the interfacial dynamics of the polymer segments. Then, platelet-adhesion tests were performed on the PPMP films. The number of platelets adhered to the PPMP film was dependent on the pre-immersion time in phosphate-buffered saline before the platelet seeding, whereas that of the reference PMMA film was unaffected by the pre-immersion time. These results could be explained in terms of the aggregation states of water at the interface.

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Acknowledgements

This research was partially supported by the JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ‘New Polymeric Materials Based on Element-Blocks’ (25102535 and 15H00758) program to KT, Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (A) (15H02183) to KT and for Scientific Research (C) (15K05633) to HM. We also appreciate the support from the JST SENTANKEISOKU (13A0004) to KT.

Author information

Author notes

    • Tomoyasu Hirai

    Current address: Institute for Materials Chemistry and Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 819-0395, Japan.

Affiliations

  1. Department of Applied Chemistry, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

    • Hisao Matsuno
    • , Ryota Tsukamoto
    • , Shinichiro Shimomura
    • , Tomoyasu Hirai
    • , Yukari Oda
    •  & Keiji Tanaka
  2. International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

    • Keiji Tanaka

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Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Hisao Matsuno or Keiji Tanaka.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/pj.2015.118

Supplementary Information accompanies the paper on Polymer Journal website (http://www.nature.com/pj)

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