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Signalling through TEC kinases regulates conventional versus innate CD8+ T-cell development

Nature Reviews Immunology volume 7, pages 479485 (2007) | Download Citation

Abstract

Recent data from three laboratories have identified the TEC kinases, ITK and RLK, as crucial regulators of CD8+ T-cell development into the conventional lymphocyte lineage. In the absence of ITK and RLK, CD4+CD8+ thymocytes upregulate the T-box transcription factor eomesodermin, and develop into mature CD8+ T cells that resemble memory cells, exhibit immediate effector cytokine production and depend on IL-15. Furthermore, the selection of these non-conventional 'innate' T cells results from interactions with haematopoietic cells in the thymus. These findings lead to the hypothesis that altered TCR signalling, together with distinct co-stimulatory signals, is the basis for the development of non-conventional T-cell lineages.

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Acknowledgements

I thank J. Kang, P. Schwartzberg, M. Felices, and A. Prince for helpful discussions. This work was supported by grants from the NIH (AI37584) and the Center for Disease Control (CI000101).

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  1. Leslie J. Berg is at the Department of Pathology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 55 Lake Avenue North, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 USA.  leslie.berg@umassmed.edu

    • Leslie J. Berg

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nri2091

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