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Are histones real pathogenic agents in sepsis?

Nature Reviews Immunology volume 18, page 148 (2018) | Download Citation

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Tom van der Poll is at the Center of Experimental & Molecular Medicine, and the Division of Infectious Diseases, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.

    • Tom van der Poll
  2. Frank L. van de Veerdonk is at the Department of Internal Medicine, and the Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 8, 6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands.

    • Frank L. van de Veerdonk
  3. Brendon P. Scicluna is at the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, and the Center of Experimental & Molecular Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Meibergdreef 9, 1105AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.

    • Brendon P. Scicluna
  4. Mihai G. Netea is at the Department of Internal Medicine, and the Center for Infectious Diseases, Radboud University Medical Center, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 8, 6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands.

    • Mihai G. Netea

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Tom van der Poll.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nri.2017.157

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