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Crystallization

Colloidal suspense

Nature Physics volume 10, pages 1213 (2014) | Download Citation

According to classical nucleation theory, a crystal grows from a small nucleus that already bears the symmetry of its end phase — but experiments with colloids now reveal that, from an amorphous precursor, crystallites with different structures can develop.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Computational Materials Science & Physics Group, Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, Hungary

    • László Gránásy
    •  & Gyula I. Tóth
  2. Brunel Centre for Advanced Solidification Technology, Brunel University, Uxbridge UB8 3PH, UK

    • László Gránásy

Authors

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to László Gránásy or Gyula I. Tóth.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys2849

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