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Superconductivity

Genetics and g-factors

Nature Physics volume 7, pages 191192 (2011) | Download Citation

Every metal has a Fermi surface, which gives rise to quantum oscillations in a magnetic field. But the nature of the Fermi surface in cuprate superconductors is a profound mystery that scientists are only starting to unravel.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Stephen R. Julian is in the Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St George Street, Toronto M5S 1A7, Canada

    • Stephen R. Julian
  2. Michael R. Norman is in the Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA.

    • Michael R. Norman

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Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Stephen R. Julian or Michael R. Norman.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphys1930

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