Review Article | Published:

Lead sulphide nanocrystal photodetector technologies

Nature Photonics volume 10, pages 8192 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

Light detection is the underlying principle of many optoelectronic systems. For decades, semiconductors including silicon carbide, silicon, indium gallium arsenide and germanium have dominated the photodetector industry. They can show excellent photosensitivity but are limited by one or more aspects, such as high production cost, high-temperature processing, flexible substrate incompatibility, limited spectral range or a requirement for cryogenic cooling for efficient operation. Recently lead sulphide (PbS) nanocrystals have emerged as one of the most promising new materials for photodetector fabrication. They offer several advantages including low-cost manufacturing, solution processability, size-tunable spectral sensitivity and flexible substrate compatibility, and they have achieved figures of merit outperforming conventional photodetectors. We review the underlying concepts, breakthroughs and remaining challenges in photodetector technologies based on PbS nanocrystals.

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Acknowledgements

This work was supported by UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) grant EP/M015513/1.

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Affiliations

  1. Advanced Technology Institute, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH, UK

    • Rinku Saran
    •  & Richard J. Curry

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Contributions

R.S. and R.J.C. co-wrote the paper.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding authors

Correspondence to Rinku Saran or Richard J. Curry.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2015.280

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