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Bioimaging

Watching the brain at work

Nature Photonics volume 8, pages 425426 (2014) | Download Citation

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It has been 20 years since near-infrared spectroscopy was first used to investigate human brain function. The technique has subsequently been extended to offer high-resolution imaging of the cortex and has now become a viable alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Robert J. Cooper is a member of the Biomedical Optics Research Laboratory, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, London WC1E 6BT, UK

    • Robert J. Cooper

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Correspondence to Robert J. Cooper.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2014.116

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