Review Article | Published:

The generation, characterization and applications of broadband isolated attosecond pulses

Nature Photonics volume 8, pages 178186 (2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

The generation of extremely short isolated attosecond pulses requires both a broad spectral bandwidth and control of the spectral phase. Rapid progress has been made in both aspects, leading to the generation of light pulses as short as 67 as in 2012, and broadband attosecond continua covering a wide range of extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray wavelengths. Such pulses have been successfully applied in photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy and recently developed attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy to study electron dynamics in matter. In this Review, we discuss significant recent advances in the generation, characterization and applications of ultrabroadband, isolated attosecond pulses with spectral bandwidths comparable to the central frequency. These pulses can in principle be compressed to a single optical cycle.

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Acknowledgements

This work is funded by the DARPA PULSE program by a grant from AMRDEC, the National Science Foundation and the Army Research Office.

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Affiliations

  1. Institute for the Frontier of Attosecond Science and Technology (iFAST), CREOL and Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816, USA

    • Michael Chini
    • , Kun Zhao
    •  & Zenghu Chang

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Zenghu Chang.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2013.362

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