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A 342-nm ultraviolet AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diode

Nature Photonics volume 2, pages 551554 (2008) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The realization of semiconductor laser diodes and light-emitting diodes that emit short-wavelength ultraviolet light is of considerable interest for a number of applications including chemical/biochemical analysis, high-density data storage and material processing. Group III nitride materials are one of the most promising candidates for fabricating such devices. Here we describe an AlGaN multiple-quantum-well laser diode that emits light at 342 nm, the shortest wavelength ever reported for an electrically driven laser diode. To fabricate the laser, a low-dislocation-density AlGaN layer with an AlN mole fraction of 0.3 was grown on a sapphire substrate using a hetero facet-controlled epitaxial lateral overgrowth (hetero-FACELO) method1,2,3. An AlGaN multiple-quantum-well structure was then grown on the high-quality AlGaN layer. Lasing at a wavelength of 342.3 nm was observed under pulsed current mode at room temperature.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge Hiroshi Amano of Meijo University for his valuable discussions and Masamichi Yamanishi of Hamamatsu Photonics for his helpful comments.

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  1. Central Research Laboratories, Hamamatsu Photonics K.K., 5000 Hirakuchi, Hamakita-ku, Hamamatsu 434-8601, Japan

    • Harumasa Yoshida
    • , Yoji Yamashita
    • , Masakazu Kuwabara
    •  & Hirofumi Kan

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Correspondence to Harumasa Yoshida.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nphoton.2008.135

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