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Revealing the hidden structure of our genome

Two methods give genetics researchers new ways to uncover different forms of genomic structural variation. Based on a novel application of existing PCR technologies, they promise to make the study of DNA rearrangements accessible to a wider field.

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Figure 1: Assays of structural variation in the human genome.