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Integrin binding: Sticking around vessels

A study demonstrates that controlled integrin binding on a biomaterial was capable of promoting vascular cell sprouting and formation of a non-leaky blood vessel network in a healthy and diseased state.

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References

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    et al. Nat. Mater. 16, 953–961 (2017).

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Michael R. Blatchley and Sharon Gerecht are in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, and the Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA

    • Michael R. Blatchley
    •  & Sharon Gerecht
  2. M.R.B. is also in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA

    • Michael R. Blatchley
  3. S.G. is also in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 USA

    • Sharon Gerecht

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Sharon Gerecht.