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Soil science

Arctic thaw

Nature Geoscience volume 3, pages 306307 (2010) | Download Citation

The organic matter stored in frozen Arctic soils could release significant quantities of carbon dioxide and methane on thawing. Now, laboratory experiments show that re-wetting of previously thawed permafrost could increase nitrous oxide production by 20-fold.

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Affiliations

  1. Hermann F. Jungkunst is at the Institute of Geography, Landscape Ecology, University of Gottingen, Goldschmidtstrasse 5, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany.  hjungku@gwdg.de

    • Hermann F. Jungkunst

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo851

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