Palaeoclimate

Atmospheric carbon footprints?

According to one controversial idea, increases in atmospheric greenhouse-gas concentrations due to human activities can be detected as early as several thousand years ago. Eight years after the publication of this hypothesis, controversy continues.

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Figure 1: Debated human footprint5.

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Brook, E. Atmospheric carbon footprints?. Nature Geosci 2, 170–172 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo446

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