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Planetary science

Mars on dry ice

Nature Geoscience volume 9, pages 1011 (2016) | Download Citation

Martian gullies have been seen as evidence for past surface water runoff. However, numerical modelling now suggests that accumulation and sublimation of carbon dioxide ice, rather than overland flow of liquid water, may be driving modern gully formation.

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  1. Colin Dundas is at the Astrogeology Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001, USA

    • Colin Dundas

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Correspondence to Colin Dundas.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2625

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