Commentary | Published:

Assigning historic responsibility for extreme weather events

Nature Climate Change volume 7, pages 757759 (2017) | Download Citation

Recent scientific advances make it possible to assign extreme events to human-induced climate change and historical emissions. These developments allow losses and damage associated with such events to be assigned country-level responsibility.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    Adoption of the Paris Agreement Article 8 (UNFCCC, 2015).

  2. 2.

    Adoption of the Paris Agreement Article 52 (UNFCCC, 2015).

  3. 3.

    United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Article 1 (UN, 1992).

  4. 4.

    & Climatic Change 133, 439–451 (2015).

  5. 5.

    & Rev. Eur. Comparative Int. Environ. Law 25, 197–214 (2016).

  6. 6.

    & Science 354, 290–292 (2016).

  7. 7.

    & Nat. Clim. Change 6, 19–20 (2016).

  8. 8.

    et al. Env. Res. Lett. 12, 024022 (2017).

  9. 9.

    & Nat. Geosci. 9, 3–5 (2016).

  10. 10.

    Attribution of Extreme Weather Events in the Context of Climate Change (National Academies, 2016).

  11. 11.

    et al. (eds) Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 97 (Special Suppl.), S1–S145 (2016).

  12. 12.

    , , & Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. 96 (Special Suppl.), 41–45 (2015).

  13. 13.

    et al. Nat. Clim. Change 6, 627–634 (2016).

  14. 14.

    Chronology — Loss and Damage (UNFCCC, 2017);

  15. 15.

    How rare were the unusually high temperatures around the North Pole in November–December 2016 and how were they influenced by anthropogenic climate change? Climate Central (21 December 2016).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Friederike. E. L. Otto and Myles R. Allen are at the Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QY, UK.

    • Friederike E. L. Otto
    •  & Myles R. Allen
  2. Ragnhild B. Skeie and Jan S. Fuglestvedt are at the Center for International Climate and Environmental Research — Oslo (CICERO), PO Box 1129 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway.

    • Ragnhild B. Skeie
    •  & Jan S. Fuglestvedt
  3. Terje Berntsen is at the Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU, UK.

    • Terje Berntsen

Authors

  1. Search for Friederike E. L. Otto in:

  2. Search for Ragnhild B. Skeie in:

  3. Search for Jan S. Fuglestvedt in:

  4. Search for Terje Berntsen in:

  5. Search for Myles R. Allen in:

Contributions

F.O., M.A. and J.F. had the idea for the paper. F.O., R.S., J.F. and T.B. designed the experiments. F.O. and R.S. conducted the experiments. All authors wrote the paper.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Friederike E. L. Otto.

Supplementary information

PDF files

  1. 1.

    Supplementary information

    Supplementary Figures and Tables

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3419

Further reading

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing