Rapid growth in global CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and industry ceased in the past two years, despite continued economic growth. Decreased coal use in China was largely responsible, coupled with slower global growth in petroleum and faster growth in renewables.

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Acknowledgements

This work is a collaborative effort of the Global Carbon Project, part of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program and Future Earth, to provide regular analyses of the main global carbon emissions and sinks (www.globalcarbonproject.org). The authors wish to thank the US Carbon Cycle Science Program and Stanford University (R.B.J.), the Australian Climate Change Science Program (J.G.C.), Research Council of Norway projects 236296 and 209701 (R.M.A., J.I.K. and G.P.P.), and the UK Natural Environment Research Council International Opportunities Fund (NE/103002X/1) (C.L.Q.) for their support. We thank the Jackson lab for comments on the manuscript.

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Affiliations

  1. School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences, Woods Institute for the Environment, and Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA

    • Robert B. Jackson
  2. Global Carbon Project, CSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia

    • Josep G. Canadell
  3. Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK

    • Corinne Le Quéré
  4. Center for International Climate and Environmental Research – Oslo, PO Box 1129 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway

    • Robbie M. Andrew
    • , Jan Ivar Korsbakken
    •  & Glen P. Peters
  5. International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, Schlossplatz 1, 2361 Laxenburg, Austria

    • Nebojsa Nakicenovic

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Correspondence to Robert B. Jackson.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2892

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