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Emergence of polycentric climate governance and its future prospects

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Abstract

The international climate regime represented by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has been widely critiqued. However, 'new' dynamic forms of climate governing are appearing in alternative domains, producing a more polycentric pattern. Some analysts believe that the new forms will fill gaps in the existing regime, but this optimism is based on untested assumptions about their diffusion and performance. The advent of polycentric governance offers new opportunities for climate action, but it is too early to judge whether hopes about the effectiveness of emerging forms of climate governance are well founded.

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Acknowledgements

We thank R. Biesbroek for helpful comments, and the COST network INOGOV — Innovations in Climate Governance for funding (IS1309). H.v.A. acknowledges funding from Sida and the Swedish Research Council (Formas).

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A.J. and D.H. conceived and designed the paper, contributed materials and wrote it. M.H., H.v.A., T.R., J.S., J.T., J.F. and E.B. contributed materials and wrote the paper.

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Correspondence to Andrew J. Jordan.

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Jordan, A., Huitema, D., Hildén, M. et al. Emergence of polycentric climate governance and its future prospects. Nature Clim Change 5, 977–982 (2015). https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2725

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