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Arctic shipping and marine invaders

Nature Climate Change volume 4, pages 413416 (2014) | Download Citation

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The emergence of new Arctic trade routes will probably change the global dynamics of invasive species, potentially affecting marine habitats and ecosystem functions, especially in coastal regions.

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Acknowledgements

We dedicate this paper to Jim Carlton, who continues to inspire and advance a deeper understanding of the ecology, impact and management of invasions. We thank Mark Minton, Ian Davidson, Oliver Floerl, Richard Everett and Bella Galil for contributing ideas and materials.

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  1. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, 647 Contees Wharf Road, PO Box 28, Edgewater, Maryland 21037, USA

    • A. Whitman Miller
    •  & Gregory M. Ruiz

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Correspondence to A. Whitman Miller.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2244

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