Review Article | Published:

Narrowing the climate information usability gap

Nature Climate Change volume 2, pages 789794 (2012) | Download Citation

Abstract

Climate-change-related risks pose serious threats to the management of a wide range of social, economic and ecological systems. Managing these risks requires knowledge-intensive adaptive management and policy-making actively informed by scientific knowledge, especially climate science1. However, potentially useful climate information often goes unused1,2. This suggests a gap between what scientists understand as useful information and what users recognize as usable in their decision-making. We propose a dynamic conceptual model to address this gap and highlight strategies to move information from useful to usable to reduce climate-related risks.

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Affiliations

  1. School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, 440 Church Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, United States

    • Maria Carmen Lemos
    • , Christine J. Kirchhoff
    •  & Vijay Ramprasad

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All authors contributed extensively to the work presented in this paper.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Maria Carmen Lemos.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1614

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