Health

A new measure of health effects

It has long been known that temperature extremes are associated with an increased risk of death. Research now directly relates future climate warming to people's lifetime.

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Figure 1: Total years of life lost in Brisbane, Australia, 1996–2004.

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Correspondence to Patrick L. Kinney.

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Kinney, P. A new measure of health effects. Nature Clim Change 2, 233–234 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1460

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