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Raging hormones in plants

Nature Chemical Biology volume 4, pages 584586 (2008) | Download Citation

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The strigolactones, a known class of plant metabolites, have now been shown to constitute the long-sought hormone that suppresses lateral branch formation. These hormones are synthesized from a carotenoid precursor in the roots and transported to the shoots.

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Affiliations

  1. Eran Pichersky is in the Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Department, University of Michigan, 830 North University, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1048, USA.  lelx@umich.edu

    • Eran Pichersky

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio1008-584

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