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AMP-activated protein kinase: nature's energy sensor

Nature Chemical Biology volume 7, pages 512518 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

Maintaining sufficient levels of ATP (the immediate source of cellular energy) is essential for the proper functioning of all living cells. As a consequence, cells require mechanisms to balance energy demand with supply. In eukaryotic cells the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) cascade has an important role in this homeostasis. AMPK is activated by a fall in ATP (concomitant with a rise in ADP and AMP), which leads to the activation of catabolic pathways and the inhibition of anabolic pathways. Here we review the role of AMPK as an energy sensor and consider the recent finding that ADP, as well as AMP, causes activation of mammalian AMPK. We also review recent progress in structural studies on phosphorylated AMPK that provides a mechanism for the regulation of AMPK in which AMP and ADP protect it against dephosphorylation. Finally, we briefly survey some of the outstanding questions concerning the regulation of AMPK.

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Acknowledgements

We thank all members of the D.C. and S.J.G. groups for helpful comments. Work in the authors' laboratories was supported by the MRC.

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Affiliations

  1. Medical Research Council (MRC) Clinical Sciences Centre, Cellular Stress Group, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, Imperial College, London, UK.

    • David Carling
    •  & Faith V Mayer
  2. MRC National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK.

    • Matthew J Sanders
    •  & Steven J Gamblin

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to David Carling.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.610

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