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Structural biology

Torqueing about pores

Nature Chemical Biology volume 9, pages 605606 (2013) | Download Citation

Cryo-EM, crystallography, biochemical experiments and computational approaches have been used to study different intermediate states of the Aeromonas hydrophila toxin aerolysin en route to pore formation. These results reveal that an unexpected and marked rotation of the core aerolysin machinery is required to unleash the membrane-spanning regions.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. James C. Whisstock is in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Structural and Functional Microbial Genomics, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

    • James C Whisstock
  2. Michelle A. Dunstone is in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and the Department of Microbiology, Monash University, Clayton, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

    • Michelle A Dunstone

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to James C Whisstock.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchembio.1341

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