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Ion-exchange materials

Seizing the caesium

Nature Chemistry volume 2, pages 161162 (2010) | Download Citation

Public acceptance of the expansion of nuclear power may hinge on the safe disposal of nuclear waste. Ion exchangers that remove radioactive metals — such as caesium ions — from the waste could provide part of the answer, so a flexible-framework material that selectively grab them from solution is a step in the right direction.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Abraham Clearfield is in the Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77842, USA.  clearfield@chem.tamu.edu

    • Abraham Clearfield

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.567

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