Self-assembly

Coordinating corners

Metal ions have been incorporated at specific pre-programmed locations into a well-defined, three-dimensional DNA structure. Applications of such cages could arise from the functionalities of the metal centres, guest encapsulation or biomimetic properties.

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Figure 1: The modular assembly process of the metal–nucleic acid cage.

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Liu, Y., Yan, H. Coordinating corners. Nature Chem 1, 339–340 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.309

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