Chemical biology

How to sweet-talk bacteria

Small sugar molecules produced by an autocatalytic reaction cycle confined inside vesicle-based 'artificial cells' can trigger a response in living bacterial cells.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: A schematic representation of protocell-to-cell communication.

References

  1. 1

    Cronin, L. et al. Nature Biotechnol. 24, 1203–1206 (2006).

  2. 2

    Szostak, J. W., Bartel, D. P. & Luisi, P. L. Nature 409, 387–390 (2001).

  3. 3

    Glass, J. I. et al. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 103, 425–430 (2006).

  4. 4

    Deamer, D. Trends Biotechnol. 23, 336–338 (2005).

  5. 5

    Rasmussen, S. et al. Science 303, 963–965 (2004).

  6. 6

    Noireaux, V. & Libchaber, A. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101, 17669–17674 (2004).

  7. 7

    Tangen, U. et al. Complexus 3, 48–57 (2006).

  8. 8

    Gardner, P. M., Winzer, K. & Davis, B. G. Nature Chem. 1, 377–383 10.1038/nchem.296(2009).

  9. 9

    Butlerow, A. Annalen 120, 295–298 (1861).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Cooper, G., Cronin, L. How to sweet-talk bacteria. Nature Chem 1, 342–343 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.306

Download citation

Further reading