Article | Published:

Self-organized architectures from assorted DNA-framed nanoparticles

Nature Chemistry volume 8, pages 867873 (2016) | Download Citation

Abstract

The science of self-assembly has undergone a radical shift from asking questions about why individual components self-organize into ordered structures, to manipulating the resultant order. However, the quest for far-reaching nanomanufacturing requires addressing an even more challenging question: how to form nanoparticle (NP) structures with designed architectures without explicitly prescribing particle positions. Here we report an assembly concept in which building instructions are embedded into NPs via DNA frames. The integration of NPs and DNA origami frames enables the fabrication of NPs with designed anisotropic and selective interactions. Using a pre-defined set of different DNA-framed NPs, we show it is possible to design diverse planar architectures, which include periodic structures and shaped meso-objects that spontaneously emerge on mixing of the different topological types of NP. Even objects of non-trivial shapes, such as a nanoscale model of Leonardo da Vinci's Vitruvian Man, can be self-assembled successfully.

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Acknowledgements

Research carried out at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973, USA

    • Wenyan Liu
    • , Jonathan Halverson
    • , Ye Tian
    • , Alexei V. Tkachenko
    •  & Oleg Gang

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Contributions

W.L. and O.G. conceived and designed the experiments. W.L. performed the experiments. W.L., Y.T. and O.G. analysed the data. J.H. and A.V.T. contributed to the theoretical/numerical analysis. W.L. and O.G. wrote the paper. O.G. supervised the projects. All the authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript.

Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Oleg Gang.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nchem.2540

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