The Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Network

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Abstract

The authors describe the rationale and initial development of a new collaborative initiative, the Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Network. The network convened by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health includes multiple stakeholders from academia, government, health care, public health, industry and consumers. The premise of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Network is that there is an unaddressed chasm between gene discoveries and demonstration of their clinical validity and utility. This chasm is due to the lack of readily accessible information about the utility of most genomic applications and the lack of necessary knowledge by consumers and providers to implement what is known. The mission of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Network is to accelerate and streamline the effective integration of validated genomic knowledge into the practice of medicine and public health, by empowering and sponsoring research, evaluating research findings, and disseminating high quality information on candidate genomic applications in practice and prevention. Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Network will develop a process that links ongoing collection of information on candidate genomic applications to four crucial domains: (1) knowledge synthesis and dissemination for new and existing technologies, and the identification of knowledge gaps, (2) a robust evidence-based recommendation development process, (3) translation research to evaluate validity, utility and impact in the real world and how to disseminate and implement recommended genomic applications, and (4) programs to enhance practice, education, and surveillance.

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank the following individuals for comments on the article: Elizabeth Gillanders, Dina Paltoo, Margaret Piper, Leah Sansbury, and Daniela Seminara.

Author information

Correspondence to Muin J Khoury.

Additional information

The report does not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the Department of Health and Human Services.

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Khoury, M., Feero, W., Reyes, M. et al. The Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention Network. Genet Med 11, 488–494 (2009) doi:10.1097/GIM.0b013e3181a551cc

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Keywords

  • decision support
  • genomics
  • information
  • medicine
  • network
  • public health

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