Clinical Study | Published:

Response of central serous chorioretinopathy evaluated by multimodal retinal imaging

Eye volume 32, pages 734742 (2018) | Download Citation

Abstract

Purpose

To identify predictive biomarkers of treatment outcomes by multimodal retinal imaging in patients affected by central serous chorioretinopathy (CSC).

Patients and methods

In this interventional non-randomized clinical study, 27 treatment-naive CSC patients were prospectively enrolled and treated with oral eplerenone for 5–13 weeks. Primary outcomes included presence of pathological findings on indocyaine green angiography (ICGA), structural optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT-angiography (OCT-A) at baseline associated with different response to the treatment.

Results

A total of 29 eyes of 27 patients (2 females, 25 males) met the inclusion criteria and were included in the study (mean age was 45±7 years). Mean CSC duration at baseline was 13.5±4.4 weeks. After a mean of 10.5 weeks of treatment, mean central macular thickness significantly reduced (P<0.001), and mean best-corrected visual acuity improved (P<0.001). Seventeen eyes (61%) demonstrated total reabsorption of subretinal fluid on structural OCT, five eyes (18%) presented a partial response to eplerenone therapy and six eyes (21%) showed no response. The complete response to the treatment was associated with absence of CNV at OCT-A and the presence of hotspot at ICGA (P<0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). None of eight eyes with CNV in OCT-A imaging had a complete response to eplerenone and none of three eyes without hotspot at ICGA showed a complete response to the treatment.

Conclusions

Multimodal retinal imaging allowed us to propose predictive biomarkers (ie, absence of CNV on OCT-A and presence of hotspot on ICGA) for treatment outcomes.

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Acknowledgements

Riccardo Sacconi, Giovanni Baldin, Adriano Carnevali, Lea Querques, Alessandro Rabiolo: none. Giorgio Marchini consultant for: Alcon (Fort Worth, TX, USA), Allergan Inc (Irvine, CA, USA), Bausch and Lomb (Rochester, NY, USA), Santen (Osaka, Japan). Francesco Bandello consultant for: Alcon (Fort Worth, TX, USA), Alimera Sciences (Alpharetta, GA, USA), Allergan Inc (Irvine, CA, USA), Farmila-Thea (Clermont-Ferrand, France), Bayer Shering-Pharma (Berlin, Germany), Bausch And Lomb (Rochester, NY, USA), Genentech (San Francisco, CA, USA), Hoffmann-La-Roche (Basel, Switzerland), NovagaliPharma (Évry, France), Novartis (Basel, Switzerland), Sanofi-Aventis (Paris, France), Thrombogenics (Heverlee, Belgium), Zeiss (Dublin, USA). Giuseppe Querques consultant for: Alimera Sciences (Alpharetta, GA, USA), Allergan Inc (Irvine, CA, USA), Heidelberg (Germany), Novartis (Basel, Switzerland), Bayer Shering-Pharma (Berlin, Germany), Zeiss (Dublin, USA). None of the Authors received financial or material support for the research and the work from any of the following organizations: National Institutes of Health (NIH); Wellcome Trust; Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI); and other(s).

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Ophthalmology, University Vita-Salute, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy

    • R Sacconi
    • , G Baldin
    • , A Carnevali
    • , L Querques
    • , A Rabiolo
    • , F Bandello
    •  & G Querques
  2. Department of Ophthalmology, University of Verona, University Hospital of Verona, Verona, Italy

    • R Sacconi
    •  & G Marchini
  3. Department of Ophthalmology, University of ‘Magna Graecia’, Catanzaro, Italy

    • A Carnevali
  4. G.B. Bietti Foundation-IRCCS, Rome, Italy

    • L Querques

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Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to G Querques.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/eye.2017.295

Supplementary Information accompanies this paper on Eye website (http://www.nature.com/eye)