Original Article | Published:

Body composition, energy expenditure and physical activity

Effect of resistance training on resting metabolic rate and its estimation by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry metabolic map

European Journal of Clinical Nutrition volume 69, pages 831836 (2015) | Download Citation

Abstract

Background/objectives:

Fat-free mass (FFM) is the major predictor of resting metabolic rate (RMR). As protein supplementation during resistance training may augment gains in FFM, we investigated the effects of resistance training combined with protein supplementation on RMR and whether RMR responses could be estimated by a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) metabolic map.

Subjects/methods:

Healthy adults completed a whole-body periodized resistance training program consisting of 96 workouts (~9 months). Participants were randomly assigned to supplement with whey protein (whey; n=18), soy protein (soy; n=21) or carbohydrate (carb; n=22). RMR was measured using indirect calorimetry (RMRIC) and estimated by DXA metabolic mapping (RMRMM) pretraining and posttraining.

Results:

RMRIC increased from pretraining to posttraining in the whole cohort (1653±302 to 1726±291 kcal/day, P=0.001) without differences between the groups. Delta RMRIC and RMRMM (73±158 vs 52±41 kcal/day were not significantly different by t-test (P=0.303), although they were not significantly correlated (r=0.081; P=0.535). Stepwise regression identified 43% of the shared variance in delta RMRIC using total serum thyroxine, RMRIC and FFM at baseline (P=0.009).

Conclusions:

These results indicate that 9 months of resistance training significantly increased RMR ~5% on average, but there was wide variability between individuals, which can be partially accounted for by changes in FFM and thyroid hormones.

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Acknowledgements

We thank a dedicated group of subjects and the research and medical staffs at the University of Connecticut for their support.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. The Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, USA

    • J C Aristizabal
    • , D J Freidenreich
    • , B M Volk
    • , B R Kupchak
    • , C Saenz
    •  & W J Kraemer
  2. Grupo de Investigación en Fisiología y Bioquimica (PHYSIS), Universidad de Antioquia, Medellín, Colombia

    • J C Aristizabal
  3. Department of Human Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA

    • C M Maresh
    •  & J S Volek

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Competing interests

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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Correspondence to J S Volek.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2014.216