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Minimal residual disease testing after stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma

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Abstract

Increased use of novel agents and autologous stem cell transplantation has led to a significant improvement in PFS and overall survival in patients with multiple myeloma. Despite improved treatment strategies, most patients eventually relapse due to persistent low levels of disease in the bone marrow. Increasingly sensitive methods to measure or detect such disease have been evaluated, including multi-parametric flow cytometry, PCR, next-generation sequencing and imaging modalities. The following literature review examines current methods for detecting and monitoring minimal or measurable residual disease (MRD) in the post-transplant setting. Improved methods for detecting MRD will refine the current definitions of remission and could guide treatment approaches.

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Sherrod, A., Hari, P., Mosse, C. et al. Minimal residual disease testing after stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma. Bone Marrow Transplant 51, 2–12 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/bmt.2015.164

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