Genome scanning of breast cancers by two-dimensional DNA typing

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Abstract

We have recently used two-dimensional DNA typing to detect genetic alterations in breast tumours. This method, which is based on size separation in neutral gels and sequence separation in denaturing gradient gels followed by hybridisation analysis with mini- and microsatellite core probes, allows the simultaneous analysis of hundreds of allelic fragments in a very short time. Here we demonstrate the potency of this method for total genome scanning of the tumour genome by analysing a small series of breast cancers. Comparison of tumour and normal DNA from ten breast cancer patients, using two-dimensional DNA typing with four core probes, revealed a considerable number of genomic alterations. In contrast, with Southern blot analysis only a few alterations were observed using the same probes. Most of the changes observed (74%) were deletions (absence of spots in the tumour) while 20% corresponded to amplifications (spots of higher intensity in the tumour) and 5% were new spots (gains). About 10% of the genomic changes detected appeared to occur in the tumours of more than one patient.

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Verwest, A., de Leeuw, W., Molijn, A. et al. Genome scanning of breast cancers by two-dimensional DNA typing. Br J Cancer 69, 84–92 (1994) doi:10.1038/bjc.1994.13

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