Laminin-1-induced migration of multiple myeloma cells involves the high-affinity 67 kD laminin receptor

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Abstract

The 67 kD laminin receptor (67LR) binds laminin-1 (LN), major component of the basement membrane, with high affinity. In this study, we demonstrated that human multiple myeloma cell lines (HMCL) and murine 5T2MM cells express 67LR. CD38bright+ plasma cells in fresh multiple myeloma (MM) bone marrow (BM) samples showed weaker 67LR expression, but expression increased after direct exposure to a BM endothelial cell line (4LHBMEC). LN stimulated the in vitro migration of 3 HMCL (MM5.1, U266 and MMS.1), primary MM cells and the murine 5T2MM cells. 67LR has been shown to mediate the actions of LN through binding to CDPGYIGSR, a 9 amino acid sequence from the B1 chain of LN. MM cell migration was partially blocked by peptide 11, a synthetic nonapeptide derived from this amino sequence and also by a blocking antiserum against 67LR. Co-injection of peptide 11 with 5T2MM cells in a murine in vivo model of MM resulted in a decreased homing of 5T2MM cells to the BM compartment. In conclusion, LN acts as a chemoattractant for MM cells by interaction with 67LR. This interaction might be important during extravasation of circulating MM cells. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com

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  • 16 November 2011

    This paper was modified 12 months after initial publication to switch to Creative Commons licence terms, as noted at publication

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Vande Broek, I., Vanderkerken, K., De Greef, C. et al. Laminin-1-induced migration of multiple myeloma cells involves the high-affinity 67 kD laminin receptor. Br J Cancer 85, 1387–1395 (2001). https://doi.org/10.1054/bjoc.2001.2078

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Keywords

  • multiple myeloma
  • homing
  • laminin-1
  • 67LR
  • migration
  • extravasation

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