RIG-I-like receptors

RIG-I-like receptors (retinoic acid-inducible gene I-like receptors, RLRs) are a family of molecules that are expressed inside cells in order to sense viruses. They recognise double-stranded RNA molecules that are produced by certain viruses and can induce antiviral immune responses.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Silica particles induce intereukin-1 (IL-1) response to contribute to lung inflammation, but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here the authors show that silica induces cell death and release of mitochondria and genomic DNA, which are sensed by STING with or without involving cGAS, respectively, for IL-1 induction and lung inflammation.

    • Sulayman Benmerzoug
    • , Stéphanie Rose
    • , Badreddine Bounab
    • , David Gosset
    • , Laure Duneau
    • , Pauline Chenuet
    • , Lucile Mollet
    • , Marc Le Bert
    • , Christopher Lambers
    • , Silvana Geleff
    • , Michael Roth
    • , Louis Fauconnier
    • , Delphine Sedda
    • , Clarisse Carvalho
    • , Olivier Perche
    • , David Laurenceau
    • , Bernhard Ryffel
    • , Lionel Apetoh
    • , Ahmet Kiziltunc
    • , Hakan Uslu
    • , Fadime Sultan Albez
    • , Metin Akgun
    • , Dieudonnée Togbe
    •  & Valerie F. J. Quesniaux
  • Research | | open

    RIG-I and MDA5, are cytosolic restriction factors and receptors for RNA viruses. Here the authors show during KSHV lytic infection that substrates for recognition by RIG-I and MDA5 are misprocessed RNAs derived from noncoding host RNA molecules, suggesting antiviral immunity can be engaged by sensing of misprocessed cellular RNAs.

    • Yang Zhao
    • , Xiang Ye
    • , William Dunker
    • , Yu Song
    •  & John Karijolich
  • Research |

    Aberrant mini viral RNAs, which are produced by erroneous RNA polymerase activity during the replication of the viral RNA genome, act as the main agonists of RIG-I during influenza virus infection.

    • Aartjan J. W. te Velthuis
    • , Joshua C. Long
    • , David L. V. Bauer
    • , Rebecca L. Y. Fan
    • , Hui-Ling Yen
    • , Jane Sharps
    • , Jurre Y. Siegers
    • , Marian J. Killip
    • , Hollie French
    • , Maria José Oliva-Martín
    • , Richard E. Randall
    • , Emmie de Wit
    • , Debby van Riel
    • , Leo L. M. Poon
    •  & Ervin Fodor
    Nature Microbiology 3, 1234-1242
  • Research | | open

    RIG-I senses cytoplasmic viral RNA, resulting in induction of an antiviral response. Here, the authors identify nuclear RIG-I and show that it binds nuclear influenza A virus RNA, resulting in a cooperative interferon induction along with its cytoplasmic counterpart.

    • GuanQun Liu
    • , Yao Lu
    • , Sathya N. Thulasi Raman
    • , Fang Xu
    • , Qi Wu
    • , Zhubing Li
    • , Robert Brownlie
    • , Qiang Liu
    •  & Yan Zhou
  • Research | | open

    The innate immunity system detects viral pathogens by sensing viral DNA or RNA via distinct pathways, but whether these pathways cross-regulate is unclear. Here the authors show that TRAF3, a known regulator of the RNA-sensing pathway, modulates an NF-κB activator NIK to control DNA-sensing by the adaptor STING in immune cells.

    • Kislay Parvatiyar
    • , Jose Pindado
    • , Anurupa Dev
    • , Saba Roghiyh Aliyari
    • , Shivam A. Zaver
    • , Hoda Gerami
    • , Maxime Chapon
    • , Amir A. Ghaffari
    • , Anant Dhingra
    •  & Genhong Cheng
  • Research | | open

    MLL5 is an essential epigenetic modifier involved in cell cycle progression, chromatin architecture and hematopoiesis. Here the authors establish that MLL5 suppresses the innate immune response in a murine model of virus infection by targeting and promoting degradation of RIG-I.

    • Peipei Zhou
    • , Xiaodan Ding
    • , Xiaoling Wan
    • , Lulu Liu
    • , Xiujie Yuan
    • , Wei Zhang
    • , Xinhui Hui
    • , Guangxun Meng
    • , Hui Xiao
    • , Bin Li
    • , Jin Zhong
    • , Fajian Hou
    • , Lihwen Deng
    •  & Yan Zhang

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