Positron-emission tomography

Definition

Positron-emission tomography (PET) is a technique for imaging the metabolic activity of internal tissues in three dimensions based on biologically active tracer compounds conjugated to positron-emitting radionuclides that are typically injected in the blood. It can be used to study cancer metastasis, brain and heart function.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Reviews |

    MRI has become the standard method for diagnosis and monitoring of patients with brain tumours, but conventional MRI sequences have important limitations. This Review summarizes the clinical role of the rapidly developing field of amino acid PET and advanced MRI techniques in adults with brain tumours, and provides an outlook for future developments in PET and MRI.

    • Karl-Josef Langen
    • , Norbert Galldiks
    • , Elke Hattingen
    •  & Nadim Jon Shah
  • Research |

    The identity of the cell types contributing to the [18F]FDG positron emission tomography signal remain highly controversial. In this study, the authors demonstrate that activating glutamate astrocytic transport increases brain [18F]FDG uptake. These findings indicate that astrocytes may also impact [18F]FDG positron emission tomography signal.

    • Eduardo R Zimmer
    • , Maxime J Parent
    • , Débora G Souza
    • , Antoine Leuzy
    • , Clotilde Lecrux
    • , Hyoung-Ihl Kim
    • , Serge Gauthier
    • , Luc Pellerin
    • , Edith Hamel
    •  & Pedro Rosa-Neto
    Nature Neuroscience 20, 393–395
  • Research | | open

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) takes up and burns fatty acids for thermogenesis in mice. Here the authors use PET to show that, in humans, cold stimulation increases BAT dietary fatty acid uptake from plasma and oxidative metabolism, although, unlike mice, human BAT takes up less fatty acids than other metabolic tissues.

    • Denis P. Blondin
    • , Hans C. Tingelstad
    • , Christophe Noll
    • , Frédérique Frisch
    • , Serge Phoenix
    • , Brigitte Guérin
    • , Éric E Turcotte
    • , Denis Richard
    • , François Haman
    •  & André C. Carpentier
  • Research | | open

    In vivo imaging of inflammation is crucial for detection and monitoring of many pathologies and noninvasive macrophage quantification has been suggested as a possible approach. Here Keliher et al. describe novel polyglucose nanoparticle tracers that are rapidly excreted by the kidney and with high affinity for macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques.

    • Edmund J. Keliher
    • , Yu-Xiang Ye
    • , Gregory R. Wojtkiewicz
    • , Aaron D. Aguirre
    • , Benoit Tricot
    • , Max L. Senders
    • , Hannah Groenen
    • , Francois Fay
    • , Carlos Perez-Medina
    • , Claudia Calcagno
    • , Giuseppe Carlucci
    • , Thomas Reiner
    • , Yuan Sun
    • , Gabriel Courties
    • , Yoshiko Iwamoto
    • , Hye-Yeong Kim
    • , Cuihua Wang
    • , John W. Chen
    • , Filip K. Swirski
    • , Hsiao-Ying Wey
    • , Jacob Hooker
    • , Zahi A. Fayad
    • , Willem J. M. Mulder
    • , Ralph Weissleder
    •  & Matthias Nahrendorf

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