Malaria

Definition

Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease that is caused by Plasmodium parasites. Patients with malaria experience flu-like symptoms and, in severe cases, the disease can progress to neurological disturbances, coma and death. Malaria is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions and causes up to one million deaths each year.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    • Brandon K. Sack
    • , Sebastian A. Mikolajczak
    • , Matthew Fishbaugher
    • , Ashley M. Vaughan
    • , Erika L. Flannery
    • , Thao Nguyen
    • , Will Betz
    • , Mary Jane Navarro
    • , Lander Foquet
    • , Ryan W. J. Steel
    • , Zachary P. Billman
    • , Sean C. Murphy
    • , Stephen L. Hoffman
    • , Sumana Chakravarty
    • , B. Kim Lee Sim
    • , Marije Behet
    • , Isaie J. Reuling
    • , Jona Walk
    • , Anja Scholzen
    • , Robert W. Sauerwein
    • , Andrew S. Ishizuka
    • , Barbara Flynn
    • , Robert A. Seder
    •  & Stefan H. I. Kappe
  • Research | | open

    The role of O-glycosylation in the malaria life cycle is largely unknown. Here, the authors identify a Plasmodium protein O-fucosyltransferase and show that it is important for normal trafficking of a subset of surface proteins, particularly CSP and TRAP, and efficient infection of mosquito and vertebrate hosts.

    • Sash Lopaticki
    • , Annie S. P. Yang
    • , Alan John
    • , Nichollas E. Scott
    • , James P. Lingford
    • , Matthew T. O’Neill
    • , Sara M. Erickson
    • , Nicole C. McKenzie
    • , Charlie Jennison
    • , Lachlan W. Whitehead
    • , Donna N. Douglas
    • , Norman M. Kneteman
    • , Ethan D. Goddard-Borger
    •  & Justin A. Boddey
  • Research | | open

    Somatic hypermutation of antibodies can occur in infants but are difficult to track. Here the authors present a new method called MIDCIRS for deep quantitative repertoire sequencing with few cells, and show infants as young as 3 months can expand antibody lineage complexity in response to malaria infection.

    • Ben S. Wendel
    • , Chenfeng He
    • , Mingjuan Qu
    • , Di Wu
    • , Stefany M. Hernandez
    • , Ke-Yue Ma
    • , Eugene W. Liu
    • , Jun Xiao
    • , Peter D. Crompton
    • , Susan K. Pierce
    • , Pengyu Ren
    • , Keke Chen
    •  & Ning Jiang
  • Research | | open

    Protein kinases are promising drug targets for treatment of malaria. Here, starting with a medicinal chemistry approach, Baker et al. generate an imidazopyridine that selectively targets Plasmodium falciparum PKG, inhibits blood stage parasite growth in vitro and in mice and blocks transmission to mosquitoes.

    • David A. Baker
    • , Lindsay B. Stewart
    • , Jonathan M. Large
    • , Paul W. Bowyer
    • , Keith H. Ansell
    • , María B. Jiménez-Díaz
    • , Majida El Bakkouri
    • , Kristian Birchall
    • , Koen J. Dechering
    • , Nathalie S. Bouloc
    • , Peter J. Coombs
    • , David Whalley
    • , Denise J. Harding
    • , Ela Smiljanic-Hurley
    • , Mary C. Wheldon
    • , Eloise M. Walker
    • , Johannes T. Dessens
    • , María José Lafuente
    • , Laura M. Sanz
    • , Francisco-Javier Gamo
    • , Santiago B. Ferrer
    • , Raymond Hui
    • , Teun Bousema
    • , Iñigo Angulo-Barturén
    • , Andy T. Merritt
    • , Simon L. Croft
    • , Winston E. Gutteridge
    • , Catherine A. Kettleborough
    •  & Simon A. Osborne

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