Immune cell death

Immune cell death is the process by which an immune cell undergoes cell death. There are various types of cell death mediated by intracellular programmes or external factors including apoptosis, necrosis, pyroptosis and necroptosis.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Immune cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to eliminate pathogens, but cell-spontaneous death and ageing may also be induced. Here the authors show that, upon sensing ROS, Mst1/2 kinases modulate the activity of Nrf2 transcription factor and downstream genetic programs to protect mouse macrophages from death and ageing.

    • Ping Wang
    • , Jing Geng
    • , Jiahui Gao
    • , Hao Zhao
    • , Junhong Li
    • , Yiran Shi
    • , Bingying Yang
    • , Chen Xiao
    • , Yueyue Linghu
    • , Xiufeng Sun
    • , Xin Chen
    • , Lixin Hong
    • , Funiu Qin
    • , Xun Li
    • , Jau-Song Yu
    • , Han You
    • , Zengqiang Yuan
    • , Dawang Zhou
    • , Randy L. Johnson
    •  & Lanfen Chen
  • Research | | open

    Corticosteroids are host-directed drugs that enhance survival of tuberculosis patients through unclear mechanisms. Here, Gräb et al. show that corticosteroids inhibit necrotic death of cells infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis by facilitating MKP-1-dependent dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK.

    • Jessica Gräb
    • , Isabelle Suárez
    • , Edeltraud van Gumpel
    • , Sandra Winter
    • , Fynn Schreiber
    • , Anna Esser
    • , Christoph Hölscher
    • , Melanie Fritsch
    • , Marc Herb
    • , Michael Schramm
    • , Laurens Wachsmuth
    • , Christian Pallasch
    • , Manolis Pasparakis
    • , Hamid Kashkar
    •  & Jan Rybniker
  • Reviews |

    • Sebastian Boeltz
    • , Poorya Amini
    • , Hans-Joachim Anders
    • , Felipe Andrade
    • , Rostyslav Bilyy
    • , Simon Chatfield
    • , Iwona Cichon
    • , Danielle M. Clancy
    • , Jyaysi Desai
    • , Tetiana Dumych
    • , Nishant Dwivedi
    • , Rachael Ann Gordon
    • , Jonas Hahn
    • , Andrés Hidalgo
    • , Markus H. Hoffmann
    • , Mariana J. Kaplan
    • , Jason S. Knight
    • , Elzbieta Kolaczkowska
    • , Paul Kubes
    • , Moritz Leppkes
    • , Angelo A. Manfredi
    • , Seamus J. Martin
    • , Christian Maueröder
    • , Norma Maugeri
    • , Ioannis Mitroulis
    • , Luis E. Munoz
    • , Daigo Nakazawa
    • , Indira Neeli
    • , Victor Nizet
    • , Elmar Pieterse
    • , Marko Z Radic
    • , Christiane Reinwald
    • , Konstantinos Ritis
    • , Patrizia Rovere-Querini
    • , Michal Santocki
    • , Christine Schauer
    • , Georg Schett
    • , Mark Jay Shlomchik
    • , Hans-Uwe Simon
    • , Panagiotis Skendros
    • , Darko Stojkov
    • , Peter Vandenabeele
    • , Tom Vanden Berghe
    • , Johan van der Vlag
    • , Ljubomir Vitkov
    • , Maren von Köckritz-Blickwede
    • , Shida Yousefi
    • , Alexander Zarbock
    •  & Martin Herrmann
  • Research | | open

    Protective antibody responses depend critically on proper B cell development and differentiation at multiple stages. Here the authors show that a protein arginine methyltransferase, Prmt5 uses multiples pathways to prevent death of immature B cells, yet modulates, in p53-independent manners, the survival and differentiation of mature B cells.

    • Ludivine C. Litzler
    • , Astrid Zahn
    • , Alexandre P. Meli
    • , Steven Hébert
    • , Anne-Marie Patenaude
    • , Stephen P. Methot
    • , Adrien Sprumont
    • , Thérence Bois
    • , Daisuke Kitamura
    • , Santiago Costantino
    • , Irah L. King
    • , Claudia L. Kleinman
    • , Stéphane Richard
    •  & Javier M. Di Noia

News and Comment

  • Research Highlights |

    The long-term survival of HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells is shown to be controlled by the anti-apoptotic protein BIRC5 and its upstream regulator OX40, which suggests new therapeutic targets to reduce the size of the viral reservoir.

    • Kirsty Minton
  • News and Views |

    Genetic integration of a humanized chemotaxis receptor unexpectedly reveals that a widely expressed immune protein is targeted by Staphylococcus aureus Panton–Valentine leukocidin in a novel way, changing our fundamental understanding of toxin–receptor biology and host–pathogen interaction.

    • Brandon Lee
    •  & Juliane Bubeck Wardenburg
    Nature Microbiology 3, 644-645
  • News and Views |

    The Streptococcus pyogenes surface M protein is a critical multifunctional virulence factor. Recent work sheds light on a new unexpected function of the M protein in activating the host inflammasome to induce macrophage cell death and promote infection.

    • Madeleine W. Cunningham
    Nature Microbiology 2, 1334-1335
  • News and Views |

    The ability to expand and contract populations of myeloid and lymphoid cells during emergency hematopoiesis helps shape the immune response. The expression of intracellular and soluble forms of osteopontin regulates apoptosis thresholds differently in myeloid cells and lymphoid cells to counter infection.

    • Motti Gerlic
    •  & Ben A Croker
    Nature Immunology 18, 953-954