HIPPO signalling

Hippo signalling is a cell signalling pathway that controls organ size. Activation of Hippo results in a series of phosphorylation events that culminate in the phosphorylation and cytoplasmic retention of a downstream transcriptional coactivator, terminating expression of Hippo-regulated genes. Hippo signalling has an important role in development and cancer.

Latest Research and Reviews

  • Research | | open

    Hippo pathway inactivation plays a role in many cancers, although how tumor cells depress signaling is unclear. Here, Lim et al. identify STK25, which activates LATS in a manner distinct from other upstream kinases and is focally deleted from a range of human cancers.

    • Sanghee Lim
    • , Nicole Hermance
    • , Tenny Mudianto
    • , Hatim M. Mustaly
    • , Ian Paolo Morelos Mauricio
    • , Marc A. Vittoria
    • , Ryan J. Quinton
    • , Brian W. Howell
    • , Hauke Cornils
    • , Amity L. Manning
    •  & Neil J. Ganem
  • Research | | open

    Hippo signaling leads to the phosphorylation of the key transcriptional effector, Yap/Yki, although how Yap/Yki stability is regulated has remained unclear. Here, Sun et al. identify HAUSP/Usp7 as a conserved and clinically relevant regulator of the Hippo pathway that increases Yap/Yki stability.

    • Xiaohan Sun
    • , Yan Ding
    • , Meixiao Zhan
    • , Yan Li
    • , Dongqing Gao
    • , Guiping Wang
    • , Yang Gao
    • , Yong Li
    • , Shian Wu
    • , Ligong Lu
    • , Qingxin Liu
    •  & Zizhang Zhou
  • Reviews |

    The Hippo pathway effectors YAP and TAZ regulate normal and tumorigenic organ growth. Recent studies in vitro and in mouse models have shown that these two transcription co-activators can also promote tissue regeneration. This property could be exploited for regenerative medicine, as long as the therapeutic approaches can minimize the potential for cancer development.

    • Iván M. Moya
    •  & Georg Halder
  • Research | | open

    Increased levels of the Yap oncoprotein stimulate liver growth and promote hepatocarcinogenesis. Here the authors show that hepatocyte-specific loss of Atg7 in mice leads to decreased autophagic degradation of Yap and liver overgrowth, and further establish this association in human liver cancer tissues.

    • Youngmin A. Lee
    • , Luke A. Noon
    • , Kemal M. Akat
    • , Maria D. Ybanez
    • , Ting-Fang Lee
    • , Marie-Luise Berres
    • , Naoto Fujiwara
    • , Nicolas Goossens
    • , Hsin-I Chou
    • , Fatemeh P. Parvin-Nejad
    • , Bilon Khambu
    • , Elisabeth G. M. Kramer
    • , Ronald Gordon
    • , Cathie Pfleger
    • , Doris Germain
    • , Gareth R. John
    • , Kirk N. Campbell
    • , Zhenyu Yue
    • , Xiao-Ming Yin
    • , Ana Maria Cuervo
    • , Mark J. Czaja
    • , M. Isabel Fiel
    • , Yujin Hoshida
    •  & Scott L. Friedman
  • Research | | open

    The transcriptional co-factors Yap and TAZ are regulated by Hippo signalling and mechanical forces via their nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Here the authors identify a RhoA-regulated C-terminal nuclear localization signal and a TEAD-regulated N-terminal nuclear export signal of TAZ in an epithelial cell line.

    • Michael Kofler
    • , Pam Speight
    • , Darby Little
    • , Caterina Di Ciano-Oliveira
    • , Katalin Szászi
    •  & András Kapus
  • Research | | open

    Hippo-YAP pathway plays an important role in cancers; however the in vivo relevance of YAP/TAZ target genes is unclear. Here, the authors show that NUAK2 is a target of YAP and participates in a feedback loop to maximize YAP activity. Inhibition of NUAK2 suppresses YAP-driven hepatomegaly and liver cancer growth, offering a new target for cancer therapy.

    • Wei-Chien Yuan
    • , Brian Pepe-Mooney
    • , Giorgio G. Galli
    • , Michael T. Dill
    • , Hai-Tsang Huang
    • , Mingfeng Hao
    • , Yumeng Wang
    • , Han Liang
    • , Raffaele A. Calogero
    •  & Fernando D. Camargo

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