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Article
Nature Neuroscience  6, 1323 - 1328 (2003)
Published online: 16 November 2003; | doi:10.1038/nn1156

An fMRI investigation of the impact of interracial contact on executive function

Jennifer A Richeson1, Abigail A Baird1, Heather L Gordon1, Todd F Heatherton1, Carrie L Wyland1, Sophie Trawalter1 & J Nicole Shelton2

1  Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, 6207 Moore Hall; Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755, USA.

2  Department of Psychology, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, USA.

Correspondence should be addressed to Jennifer A Richeson jriches@dartmouth.edu
We investigated whether individual differences in racial bias among white participants predict the recruitment, and potential depletion, of executive attentional resources during contact with black individuals. White individuals completed an unobtrusive measure of racial bias, then interacted with a black individual, and finally completed an ostensibly unrelated Stroop color-naming test. In a separate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) session, subjects were presented with unfamiliar black male faces, and the activity of brain regions thought to be critical to executive control was assessed. We found that racial bias predicted activity in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in response to black faces. Furthermore, activity in this region predicted Stroop interference after an actual interracial interaction, and it statistically mediated the relation between racial bias and Stroop interference. These results are consistent with a resource depletion account of the temporary executive dysfunction seen in racially biased individuals after interracial contact.

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Nature Neuroscience
ISSN: 1097-6256
EISSN: 1546-1726
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