Table of Contents

Japanese Table of Contents

Volume 471 Number 7336 pp5-130

3 March 2011

About the cover

In 1946, a study began of all the babies born in one March week in England, Wales and Scotland, with a view to learning more about the social and economic costs of childbearing. Today the study is still going, and is one of the longest-running studies of human development in the world. The 1946 cohort has been followed into adulthood, so has allowed researchers to investigate how childhood health and lifetime social circumstances affect adult health and wealth. This week, the participants celebrate their 65th birthdays, the age at which many people in the United Kingdom retire. So now the National Survey of Health and Development has become a study of ageing. Helen Pearson talked to the survey�s scientists and members of the 1946 cohort about the scientific immortality that their participation has given them, and looks at how priceless the accumulated data have become. Cover graphic: Oliver Munday.

This Week

Editorials

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  • The generation game

    Birth-cohort studies offer invaluable data on the links between childhood development and later life, but today's efforts could learn something from a pioneering project that turns 65 this week.

  • Invest to diversify

    Despite many federal initiatives, the number of US scientists from minority groups remains low.

  • Dark rumblings

    The Large Hadron Collider is stirring up trouble, and that's good news for science.

World View

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Seven Days

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News in Focus

Features

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  • Epidemiology: Study of a lifetime

    In 1946, scientists started tracking thousands of British children born during one cold March week. On their 65th birthday, the study members find themselves more scientifically valuable then ever before.

    • Helen Pearson

comment

  • In praise of Luddism

    Two centuries on from the Luddite insurrection, David Edgerton celebrates today's most important opponents to new ideas, inventions and innovations: scientists.

Books and Arts

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  • Agriculture: A bowl half full

    Calestous Juma's vision for African farming is refreshingly optimistic, finds Camilla Toulmin.

    • Review of The New Harvest: Agricultural Innovation in Africa Calestous Juma
  • Theatre: Poles apart on climate

    Two contrasting plays highlight the difficulties of putting global warming on stage, finds Kerri Smith.

    • Review of Greenland The Heretic Moira Buffini Matt Charman Penelope Skinner Jack Thorne Richard Bean
  • Anthropology: The Iceman defrosted

    Marta Paterlini reports on an exhibition marking 20 years since Ötzi, one of the world's oldest natural mummies, was discovered under the Alpine ice.

    • Review of Ötzi20: Life, Science, Fiction, Reality
  • Q&A: Facing the past: Manolis Papagrigorakis

    The Athens-based orthodontist explains the art and science of reconstructing the heads of long-dead people from their skulls alone, including that of Myrtis — a young girl from more than 2,000 years ago, whose recreated face is our first glimpse of an ordinary ancient Greek.

Correspondence

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Careers

Features

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Q&As

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  • Turning point: Louise Glass

    Microbiologist Louise Glass's new fellowship will help her pursue a longstanding interest in converting fungi to bioenergy.

    • Virginia Gewin

Career Briefs

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Futures

research

Review

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Articles

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Letters

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Corrigendum

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Retraction

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