Nature 140, 454-455 (11 September 1937) | doi:10.1038/140454a0

Prof. F. C. S. Schiller

G. D. H.

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PROF. F. C. S. SCHILLER, who died in Los Angeles on August 7 after a long and lingering illness, was born in 1864, the son of Ferdinand Schiller of Calcutta. He was educated at Rugby and Balliol, and graduated in the first class of Literse Humaniores, winning later the Taylorian scholarship for German in 1887. For a few years (1893–97) he occupied the post of instructor in philosophy at Cornell University. Then in 1897 he returned to Oxford, and became fellow and tutor of Corpus, where he remained for more than thirty years. His former pupils speak of him as a decidedly stimulating and suggestive teacher, who, although out of touch with the types of philosophical theory prevalent in Oxford, exerted considerable influence there as an acute critic and searcher after truth. He was president of the Aristotelian Society in 1921, and had from 1906 onwards contributed to its Proceedings a large number of papers. At philosophical gatherings he was a well-known figure ; he read, for example, a paper at the International Congress of Philosophy, held at Harvard in 1926. To Mind he was a frequent contributor, and was for many years treasurer of the Mind Association. In 1926 he was elected a fellow of the British Academy. In 1929 he was appointed visiting professor in the University of Southern California, and was accustomed latterly to spend half of each year in the United States and half in England.