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Highly conducting graphene sheets and Langmuir–Blodgett films

Nature Nanotechnology volume 3, pages 538542 (2008) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Graphene is an intriguing material with properties that are distinct from those of other graphitic systems1,2,3,4,5. The first samples of pristine graphene were obtained by ‘peeling off’2,6 and epitaxial growth5,7. Recently, the chemical reduction of graphite oxide was used to produce covalently functionalized single-layer graphene oxide8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15. However, chemical approaches for the large-scale production of highly conducting graphene sheets remain elusive. Here, we report that the exfoliation–reintercalation–expansion of graphite can produce high-quality single-layer graphene sheets stably suspended in organic solvents. The graphene sheets exhibit high electrical conductance at room and cryogenic temperatures. Large amounts of graphene sheets in organic solvents are made into large transparent conducting films by Langmuir–Blodgett assembly in a layer-by-layer manner. The chemically derived, high-quality graphene sheets could lead to future scalable graphene devices.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Graftech for providing expandable graphite samples. This work was supported in part by Intel, the Microelectronics Advanced Research Corporation Materials, Structures and Devices (MARCO MSD) Focus Centre and the Office of Naval Research.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA

    • Xiaolin Li
    • , Guangyu Zhang
    • , Xiaoming Sun
    • , Xinran Wang
    •  & Hongjie Dai
  2. Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China

    • Xuedong Bai
    •  & Enge Wang

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Contributions

H.D. and X.L. conceived and designed the experiments. X.L. and G.Z. performed the experiments and analysed the data. H.D. and X.L. co-wrote the manuscript. All authors discussed the results and commented on the manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Hongjie Dai.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nnano.2008.210

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