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Global and societal implications of the diabetes epidemic

Nature volume 414, pages 782787 (13 December 2001) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Changes in human behaviour and lifestyle over the last century have resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of diabetes worldwide. The epidemic is chiefly of type 2 diabetes and also the associated conditions known as 'diabesity' and 'metabolic syndrome'. In conjunction with genetic susceptibility, particularly in certain ethnic groups, type 2 diabetes is brought on by environmental and behavioural factors such as a sedentary lifestyle, overly rich nutrition and obesity. The prevention of diabetes and control of its micro- and macrovascular complications will require an integrated, international approach if we are to see significant reduction in the huge premature morbidity and mortality it causes.

“Man may be the captain of his fate, but he is also the victim of his blood sugar”  Wilfrid Oakley [Trans. Med. Soc. Lond. 78, 16 (1962)]

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Affiliations

  1. *International Diabetes Institute, 260 Kooyong Road, Caulfield, Victoria 3162, Australia

    • Paul Zimmet
    •  & Jonathan Shaw
  2. †Royal College of Physicians, 11 St Andrews Place, Regent's Park, London NW1 4LE, UK

    • K. G. M. M. Alberti

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Correspondence to Paul Zimmet.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/414782a

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